Today's thought

Money, money, money

I think a lot of money-related quotes are just silly.

1. “Money can’t buy happiness.”
Counter-point: Money DOES buy happiness in a lot of meaningful ways. Maybe not to a billionaire with glaring personality flaws and deep relationship issues — but to you and me (non-billionaires), being able to comfortably buy the things we want or need would absolutely make us happier.

2. “We buy things we don't need, with money we don't have, to impress people we don't like.”
I think Dave Ramsey coined that one. Ask yourself: How many things do you really buy for the sake of impressing someone else? My guess is very, very few — at least, not since like high school. Most things are bought for a very good reason, or with the intent of improving our lives in some physical, emotional, or spiritual way.

3. “Don’t invest in things… invest in experiences.”
I’m guilty of biting on this one, but… it’s usually proclaimed by people with an abundance of things already. Don't get me wrong, experiences are great: They make life better in a lot of ways — but they’re usually an extension of our “regular” lives, not the main substance. Putting your hard-earned cash toward improving your everyday life will most likely benefit you more than daydreaming about spending it all flying around the globe.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with the idea of becoming happier via money and the things you own, and any attempts to convince you otherwise are simply misconstrued. Do what you want, and don’t apologize.

I think a lot of money-related quotes are just silly.

1. “Money can’t buy happiness.”
Counter-point: Money DOES buy happiness in a lot of meaningful ways. Maybe not to a billionaire with glaring personality flaws and deep relationship issues — but to you and me (non-billionaires), being able to comfortably buy the things we want or need would absolutely make us happier.

2. “We buy things we don't need, with money we don't have, to impress people we don't like.”
I think Dave Ramsey coined that one. Ask yourself: How many things do you really buy for the sake of impressing someone else? My guess is very, very few — at least, not since like high school. Most things are bought for a very good reason, or with the intent of improving our lives in some physical, emotional, or spiritual way.

3. “Don’t invest in things… invest in experiences.”
I’m guilty of biting on this one, but… it’s usually proclaimed by people with an abundance of things already. Don't get me wrong, experiences are great: They make life better in a lot of ways — but they’re usually an extension of our “regular” lives, not the main substance. Putting your hard-earned cash toward improving your everyday life will most likely benefit you more than daydreaming about spending it all flying around the globe.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with the idea of becoming happier via money and the things you own, and any attempts to convince you otherwise are simply misconstrued. Do what you want, and don’t apologize.

Hundred Daily™ is a 100-day writing challenge by Aaron Rolston. The goal is to publish 100(ish) words daily & send them out via email. Consider subscribing if you'd like to receive daily broadcasts from me.

Aaron Rolston © 2099

Aaron Rolston © 2099